Tin House: “Sisters” by Jon Durbin

 

3AM Magazine: “alight at the next” by Eley Williams

“// A  man // pushes on // to get inside // the carriage before I’ve had time //  to step down

and, without thinking and certainly without hinges I am holding out my hand and placing a finger in the middle of his forehead.

He freezes. The carriage freezes, a carriage steamed-up and bulbous with umbrellas and the slapping batskin wings of waterproof jackets.”

From “alight at the next” by Eley Williams (3AM Magazine).

Listen: BBC National Short Story Award 2018 stories

See if you can choose the winning story, which will get £15,000 for its author. Here’s more about the short-listed stories and the competition (BBC). Men, knock before entering.

Spelk: The Burnt Moth by Gerard McKeown

If that evocative and insightful flash struck home, you can read more by Gerard McKeown, his prizewinning 2017 short story “A History of Fire” in Willesden Herald: New Short Stories 10.

Granta | Sheila Heti and Tao Lin discuss writing

A conversation about their experiences writing books under contract and dealing with editors, agents etc. Tao Lin’s story “Sasquatch” was short-listed for the Willesden Herald prize in our first year (2005/6).

Ninevah by Henrietta Rose-Innes to be a film

Blake Friedmann agency announces a film deal for Ninevah by Henrietta Rose-Innes

Henrietta Rose-Innes, winner of the Caine prize for African writing, is also – and you can probably guess by now, from how we select stories – a past contributor to New Short Stories. She has published several novels and short story collections. One of the stories in her collection Homing is also in Willesden Herald: New Short Stories 4.

Becoming Belle – Nuala O’Connor

For the second time today, I’m using the phrase “twice contributor to New Short Stories,” in this case for Nuala O’Connor who, it is fair to say, is one of Ireland’s foremost writers of novels and poetry, as well as short stories. She has published several short story collections and some of her stories can be found online, like this one from 2016: Storks by Nuala O’Connor in the Irish Times.